Grammar Gripes and Tips

Rampant Abuse of Apostrophes’


I’m offended. People (reporters too) are abusing apostrophes and putting them where they don’t belong. An apostrophe’s purpose is to indicate possession, not plurality (usually, the “s” takes care of that). Another use, according to Google, is to indicate the omission of letters or numbers, such as you’ll (you will) or ’17 (2017).

Take a look below and see if some of your pet peeves appear. If they don’t, let me know what irks you.

Violations I’ve run across recently

Back in August, Savanah Nabors’, a former assistant to Sheriff Lewis, made accusations of sexual assault against him in a public blog post. – WYFF
Savanah’s last name has an “s” on the end. There’s no need to place an apostrophe after it unless the statement was, “Savanah Nabors’ neighbors are out-of-town.”

The Sansbury’s opened their dining concept almost six years ago. The Sansbury’s will open in their new space across the street from downtown Spartanburg’s new AC Hotel in early January. – Upstate Business Journal
The Sanburys are a married couple who own a dining concept, but in the sentences above, they are merely subjects.

The event celebrates mother’s of excellence.
It’s just a group of mothers who happen to be excellent; they don’t own excellence.

I checked ID’s at the festival.
Plain ole IDs will suffice. The writer checked more than one identification card. It’s as simple as that. You’d apply the same logic to SUVs or VIPs.

Which of these logo’s do you guys think looks the best for my personal branding?  
The logos don’t possess anything. They’re just multiple logo options, people.
nice squiggle

Why You’re Not More Smarter Than a Fifth Grader

smarter 5th grader

If you are doubling down on your comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs, you’re doing too much.

A comparative adjective compares the difference between two objects and a comparative adverb compares the varying degree of a verb. Both are either preceded by the word “more” or end in the suffix -er.  A superlative adjective compares the difference between three or more objects and a superlative adverb compares the varying degree of a verb. Both are either preceded by the word “most” or end in the suffix -est.

Examples of Comparative Adjective and Adverbs

  1. She is friendlier than her brother.
    OR
    She is more friendly than her brother.

NOT: She is more friendlier than her brother. The “er” suffix takes the place of the word “more.” There is no need to use both; choose one.

  1. He swam that lap quicker than the first.
    OR
    He swam that lap more quickly than the first.

NOT: He swam that lap more quicker than the first. Again, the “er” suffix takes the place of the word “more.” There is no need to use both; choose one.


Examples of Superlative Adjectives and Adverbs

  1. Ryan is the cutest basketball player on the team.
    OR
    Ryan is the most cute basketball player on the team.

NOT: Ryan is the most cutest basketball player on the team. The “est” suffix takes the place of the word “most.” There is no need to use both; choose one superlative.

  1. Sam played his drums loudest at night.
    OR
    Sam played his drums the most loud at night.

NOT: Sam played his drums the most loudest at night. Again, there is no need to use both; choose one superlative.

  1. The DA prosecuted drug dealers most mercilessly.

Let’s NOT even go there with the double superlatives. You wouldn’t dare put an -iest on the end of mercilessly, so there’s no need to mangle above sentence.
nice squiggle

Irregardless is Not a Word

irregardless

In my humble opinion, it’s not a legitimate one. I’ve heard some great public speakers and a former supervisor say it numerous times. I figure they confused it with irrelevant.

I prefaced this post acknowledging this is my opinion because when I googled the word to grab an accompanying image, I ran across some sites/articles arguing its legitimacy. Yes, while most admit that the word is a double negative because the “less” suffix takes care of the negating factor and the “ir” prefix also denotes something is without regard, they believe that because you know what a person means when they say it, the word is valid. I disagree.

I may know what someone means when they say, “I don’t wish this pain on nobody,” but that doesn’t make the statement any less grammatically incorrect. What’s your take?